WAHO Biweekly Malaria News Roundup: Top Highlights on Malaria in West Africa and Around the Globe

WAHO Biweekly Malaria News Roundup: Top Highlights on Malaria in West Africa and Around the Globe

In this issue for September 29 – October 12, 2019::

  1. BASF, MedAccess and BMGF partner to end malaria in sub-Saharan Africa
  2. Ghana undertakes nationwide mapping of mosquito breeding sites
  3. Misuse of mosquito nets among residents of fishing communities in Malawi
  4. Windborne mosquitoes may transmit malaria over long distances, new research shows
  5. New rapid malaria diagnostic test underway as researchers receive up to 1 million euros for trials

 

BASF, MedAccess and BMGF partner to fight malaria in sub-Saharan Africa

BASF, MedAccess and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) have announced a four-year partnership to support the supply of 35 million innovative mosquito-control technology Interceptor® G2 mosquito nets in the fight against malaria. The trio made this announcement at the sixth Replenishment Conference of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria which held in Lyon, France from October 9 -10, 2019. The tripartite agreement aims to accelerate access to mosquito nets in malaria endemic countries across sub-Saharan Africa, including Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire and Mali, where insecticide resistance has become a growing concern. By means of the partnership, BASF agreed to reduce the cost of the new nets by 40% in a bid to make them more accessible and affordable. Speaking on the partnership, President of Global Health, BMGF, Trevor Mundel said it will “help us stay ahead of resistance and bring new tools that are much needed to the fight against a disease that can be effectively prevented.” This agreement would also facilitate the concerted efforts of the Global Fund, Unitaid and the Clinton Health Access Initiative in helping communities afflicted with malaria.

Click here to read more

 

Ghana undertakes nationwide mapping of mosquito breeding sites

As Zoomlion Ghana Limited conducts a nationwide mapping of the mosquito breeding sites across the country, the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) manager, Dr. Keziah Malm embarked on a tour of the eastern and central regional districts to inspect the ongoing activity. The mapping is being done via smart devices aided by an application software which digitally records the GPS coordinates of specific breeding sites ahead of the planned application of biolarvicides to kill mosquitoes. During the inspection, Dr. Malm urged the environmental health officers within the eastern and central regional districts to mobilize and educate their communities on environmental sanitation management approaches towards reducing the number of mosquito breeding sites by practicing good sanitary measures. She also expressed her optimism that a multipronged approach towards mosquito vector control would help to control the mosquito population across the country.

Click here to read more

 

Misuse of mosquito nets among residents of fishing communities in Malawi

A new study has revealed that residents of fishing communities in Malawi have redirected the use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) originally meant for protection against malaria, for fishing and other agricultural purposes instead. A major reason for this was attributed to high levels of poverty and food insecurity in the region. Such misuse presents a significant challenge in the prevention and control of malaria in Malawi where about 28 million ITNs were distributed between 2004 and 2017. Co-author of study and director of the Malaria Alert Centre, University of Malawi remarked that such misuse of nets could negatively affect coverage levels of the ITNS which in turn could affect population and individual protection levels. Associate research professor of medical entomology at the Tropical Pesticides Research Institute in Arusha, Tanzania, Eliningaya Kweka therefore calls for strict measures by the government to mitigate such misuse of the ITNs.

Click here to read more

 

Windborne mosquitoes may transmit malaria over long distances, new research shows

A new research conducted by some scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) in Bethesda, Maryland, the University of Bamako, Mali has shown that malaria-bearing mosquitoes are able to travel over hundreds of kilometers and as high as 290 meters above the ground in a single night in Sahel, the semidesert region of the southern Sahara Desert. The research which was published in Nature, provides additional information to the widely known scientific knowledge that mosquitoes fly typically within a limited range of 5 kilometers. The research could imply that long-distance travel by mosquitoes could increase the risk of malaria reintroduction following elimination. It could also imply that the spread of insecticide-resistant mosquitoes and drug resistant parasites may possibly increase. Nora Besansky, from the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, noted that while the study suggested that malaria parasites are transported during long-distance air travel, it “didn’t show it directly” therefore, additional studies may be required.

Click here for more

 

New rapid malaria diagnostic test underway as researchers receive up to 1 million euros for trials

A new rapid test to diagnose malaria that uses saliva instead of blood could be available in the next two years as researchers receive over 1 million euros for field trials and development from the Japan's Global Health Innovative Technology (GHIT).  The new test which will be marketed under the brand name SALVA!. The medical technology start-up behind the test, Erada, explained that it is expected that SALVA! would make the diagnosis of malaria not only faster but also cheaper.  The diagnosis works by detecting a biomarker in the saliva of an individual carrying the Plasmodium parasite between 5 – 20 minutes and even before the person starts to show symptoms or comes down with the disease. SALVA! will also be easier for health care professionals, teachers and even parents to administer particularly to children as it requires the use of saliva (without the needing a laboratory) rather than blood.

Click here to read more

image
Malaria News
West African Health Organization
01 BP 153 Bobo-Dioulasso 01 / Burkina Faso
(226) 20 97 01 00 / (226) 20 97 57 75
(226) 20 97 57 72